Tag: disruption

Everyone in chip design uses a browser - there’s little doubt in that. I’d wager that most chip designers spend more time in a browser than in any other tool, including the command line, emacs or vi text editor, the Eclipse IDE, and the logic simulator.

Today, chip designers are likely to use a browser for:

  • Looking at various indexes of technical documentation in HTML and PDF, including IP and register map specifications and document control
  • Viewing development reports, test coverage data and analysis
  • Researching suppliers, IP, algorithms, technical standards, how to articles, …
  • Managing bugs
  • Collaborating through a Wiki
  • Accessing various other information on the corporate Intranet
  • Reading EE Times and Slashdot while waiting for that long test-case, simulation or synthesis job to complete

Though not a chip designer anymore, I’ve been spending more time working in a browser, especially now that I’ve warmed up to Google Apps. And I’m not alone. I’ve even heard of some chip design companies using it too. Now that the word is out that Google is building chips, there is a good chance that they’d use Google Apps. Let’s face it, there is a lot of spreadsheet work in chip design and Google Spreadsheets is quite powerful, especially in a collaborative context. There is also a lot of block diagram work too and Google’s new Drawings tool offers hope there. Whether you like web-apps or not, I think most chip designers would agree, the browser is increasingly used for legitimate work.

There are many areas in chip dev where the browser can play a bigger role, especially in a collaborative context. One recent example, is Synopsys’ Lynx Design System which appears to have a browser GUI for it’s Management Cockpit. At PDTi we’ve been pushing the limits of using the browser for all things register management, for capturing and modelling the executable specification and generating dependent code and documentation.

Google has been pushing the limits of what is possible in the browser. The impressive video showing Quake II running in a browser is mind-blowing and highlights the possibilities of HTML5 and the next-gen browser. This supports the argument that graphical EDA tools such as the simulation waveform debuggers and graphical layout tools are possible and could be supplied as a web application; perhaps even under the SaaS model.

Are the naysayers missing something here - could the browser be the ubiquitous platform for everything, even EDA tools and Chip Design?

Tweet from S_Tomasello Hows the attendance at #46DAC today? Umm...

Twitpic from S_Tomasello "How's the attendance at #46DAC today? Umm..."

Last week at the Moscone Center in San Fransisco, the 46th annual Design Automation Conference (DAC) took place.  I’ve attended this conference for the past 4 years and decided not to attend this year.  This year I attended virtually using the web.

In the EDA media and for EDA trade shows, as Bob Dylan sang, the times they are a-changin’.  It’s no secret that the incumbent media is struggling to find a business model that works in the uncharted waters of the future.  As history repeats itself, the “hidden hand of supply and demand” will no doubt fix some shortfall with the traditional model — a shortfall that may not be fully understood until it is solved.

With the electronic media shedding their top writers, the coverage of DAC by trade publications is diminishing.  At the same time, new media, such as blogs, Twitter, and LinkedIn are picking up some slack.  For example, Richard Goering and Michael Santarini who historically covered DAC for EETimes and EDN now write for Cadence and Xilinx respectively.  Some of the best DAC summaries that I read were blogged by:

Additionally, on Twitter, the #46DAC tag provided useful information about what was going on at the tradeshow.  For me, some tweeps who provided informative DAC coverage via Twitter included:

  • Dark_Faust — editor in chief of Chip Design & Embedded Intel magazines & editorial director of Extension Media
  • harrytheASICguy — ASIC consultant & blogger, did a Synopsys XYZ conversation central sessions at DAC
  • jlgray — Consultant with Verilab, photographer, coolverification.com blogger, conference presenter
  • karenbartleson — Sr. Director of Community Marketing at Synopsys and blogger on “The Standards Game.”  Karen won “EDA’s Next Top Blogger” at DAC.  Karen did a lot of tweeting to inform people about the #46DAC and Synopsys Conversation Central had a “Twitter Tower” that displayed the #46DAC stream.
  • MikeDemler — Tech industry analyst, former marketing insider (from Synopsys), blogs at “The world is Analog”
  • paycinera — EDA Confidential editor Peggy Aycinena broke her cryptic series of gobbledygook biography tweets, the EDA Town & Gown Twitter Project, to provide some of the best Twitter coverage from DAC
  • S_Tomasello — Marketing at Sonics, the providers of “On-chip communications networks for advanced SoCs”

Based on the various reports and summaries from DAC, there is an apparent need for collaboration (as mentioned by keynote Fu-Chieh Hsu of TSMC) and productivity (as mentioned by the CEO panel). The same forces that are changing EDA trade media and conferences — the power of the Internet, coupled with economic forces –may enable the solution to better collaboration and productivity. Cloud computing business models like Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) are starting to prove themselves in other industries and will continue to find their way into commonplace. Exactly what the “hidden hand of supply and demand” has in store for EDA and cloud computing has yet to be revealed and we are just in the early stages now.

From various blogs and Twitter, without having attended DAC, I understand that:

  • there continues to be a need for better collaboration, productivity, and higher levels of abstraction
  • today’s current economic situation, spurred by the US credit melt-down, has affected EDA
    • the traditional trade media is struggling
    • new chip design starts are down
    • Magma design Automation, released that they are re-negotiating debt as a result of an audit report regarding their solvency, just as the conference was kicking off
    • traffic on the trade floor was questionable: some said it was above expectations while others said it was below
    • new VC investment in EDA start-ups is pretty much non-existent
    • TSMC is becoming more and more of an ecosystem heavyweight
    • there is optimism about the future and the recovery of EDA — with change and crisis, there comes opportunity for those who see it
  • the media landscape is changing
    • there is a struggle between the blogsphere and traditional press to cover EDA
    • blogs are gaining acceptance and playing more and more of a role
    • filtering through and connecting disperse info is a problem
    • John Cooley dismisses the utility of blogging, LinkedIn and Twitter and critics say Cooley just doesn’t get it (or virtual platforms and virtual prototypes for that matter)
  • there are big opportunities for Software design, and EDA can play there
    • Embedded software has the possibility to double EDA, says Gary Smith, who has pointed to software as the problem for several years now
    • embedded software seats are growing but market is fragmented
    • software IP is of growing importance in the differentiation of SoC platforms
    • the programming models need to change for multi-core
    • multi-core and parallel computing programming models are still pretty low level, like assembly and micro-code
    • Mentor Graphics announced their acquisition of Embedded Alley Solutions, a leader in Android and Linux development systems, unveiling their new Android & Linux strategy
  • System Level is big, particularly for SoC virtual platforms, architectural optimization and IP
    • the SPIRIT Consortium and IP-XACT has merged into Accellera, and there continues to be a need for better standards
    • IP still has a lot of potential and the business model is becoming clearer
    • Despite the importance of ESL, much work is still done at lower levels of abstraction
    • ARC International, the IP and configurable processor provider, is rumored to be under acquisition
  • FPGA
    • Companies are moving to FPGAs and away from ASIC
    • ESL is big for FPGAs
    • Not nearly as much FPGA discussion at DAC as there should be
  • Cloud computing opportunities are being underlooked by EDA (let’s start with the on-site private cloud then look at multi-tenant ecosystem clouds)

In conclusion, I was able to absorb a lot of details about DAC without attending thanks to all the bloggers, Tweeters and trade media.  EDA is changing in some exciting ways that scream opportunity for some and failure for others, and that’s what makes the future so exciting.